Monday, November 23, 2015

THE TRILOGY OF TWO by Juman Malouf for MMGM

First, some interesting news for fans of T.A. Barron's Young Merlin saga. They're making a movie! Woo hoo! And the script is being written by the co-writer of The Lord of the Rings movies, so there are high expectations for this film (and its possible sequels). That's excellent news for T.A. Barron fans.

Now on to today's MMGM. For other marvelous middle grade posts, see Shannon Messenger's blog.

The Trilogy of Two written and illustrated by Juman Malouf (Putnam's, November 10, 2015, for ages 10 and up, 416 pages)

Synopsis (from the publisher):  Twelve-year-old identical twins Sonja and Charlotte are musical prodigies with extraordinary powers. Born on All-Hallows-Eve, the girls could play music before they could walk. They were found one night by Tatty, the Tattooed Lady of the circus, in a pail on her doorstep with only a note and a heart-shaped locket. They’ve been with Tatty ever since, roaming the Outskirts in the circus caravans, moving from place to place.

But lately, curious things happen when they play their instruments. During one of their performances, the girls accidentally levitate their entire audience, drawing too much unwanted attention. Soon, ominous Enforcers come after them, and Charlotte and Sonja must embark on a perilous journey through enchanted lands in hopes of unlocking the secrets of their mysterious past.

Why I recommend it: Wow! This is a highly imaginative fantasy, with impressive world building by Malouf. It's set in a world that could be Earth in a far future (or an alternate past) when million-mile-high cities have overrun the planet. The author herself described it as a "post-apocalyptic, Dickensian world" in this article from The Daily Beast.

The twins are forced to travel to the Seven Edens, worlds they previously knew only as stories represented by the tattoos completely covering Tatty's skin. Luckily, they're accompanied by an intrepid band of new friends. So it's a classic journey story, a la Lord of the Rings or The Wizard of Oz, but with quite a few dark and startling twists. There is some violence, so I would not recommend this for younger middle grade readers. It's also quite lengthy, so give this to kids who love the longer Harry Potter books, or The Invention of Hugo Cabret.

Favorite line:  Charlotte ran through the gate and zigzagged among the broken-down railcars. She tried to remember pieces of music she used to play, but they all blended together in a tangle of notes. (from p. 71)

Bonus: Fantastically-detailed drawings by the author are the perfect accompaniment to this unusual story. Before she turned to writing and illustrating children's books, Juman Malouf was the set designer and costume designer for the film The Grand Budapest Hotel.


Readers, please note: After today, I'm taking a blogging break to catch up on my reading and writing, and also get ready for the holidays. I wish you all the happiest of holidays, no matter which holiday(s) you celebrate. Here's a photo of my TBR pile, all spread out. Hoping to get to these (and possibly more) before January. Wish me luck!

Monday, November 16, 2015

SWITCH by Ingrid Law, a companion to SAVVY

Switch by Ingrid Law (September 2015, Dial Books for Young Readers, for ages 8 to 12)

Synopsis (from Indiebound): Gypsy Beaumont has always been a whirly-twirly free spirit, so as her thirteenth birthday approaches, she hopes to get a magical ability that will let her fly, or dance up to the stars. Instead, she wakes up on her birthday with blurry vision . . . and starts seeing flashes of the future and past. But when Momma and Poppa announce that her very un-magical, downright mean Grandma Pat has Alzheimer's and is going to move in with them, Gypsy's savvy along with her family's suddenly becomes its opposite. Now it's savvy mayhem as Gypsy starts freezing time, and no one could have predicted what would happen on their trip to bring Grandma Pat home . . . not even Gypsy.

Why I recommend it: Fantastic voice, loads of imagination, and a really cool savvy. I'm a huge fan of Ingrid Law's first book, SAVVY, which won a Newbery Honor and was also the Number One Book Sense (now Indiebound) Children's Pick for Summer 2008. See my thoughts here, in the American Bookseller Association's archives. Another favorite, SCUMBLE (2010), is a companion to SAVVY which explores Cousin Ledge's unusual talent and how he learns to control it. Now, with SWITCH, another companion novel, we see the Beaumont family from the POV of Gypsy, younger sister to Mibs. 

Bonus: Companion novels, instead of sequels, are a fun way to follow the same unusually-talented family but get to know different characters. Gypsy was only three in SAVVY, and now she's thirteen. It's like watching her grow up. 

Favorite line: "The snowflakes hung like poetry over the city." (p. 239, after Gypsy freezes time)

I especially loved what happened when Gypsy stopped time, and wish I could do the same thing! What savvy do you wish you had? 

Monday, November 9, 2015

A giveaway winner -- and for MMGM, a review of THE THING ABOUT JELLYFISH

First, I have a winner to announce. The winner of 101 MOVIES TO SEE BEFORE YOU GROW UP by Suzette Valle is:

Susan Gregory

Congratulations, Susan! I'll get your book out to you pronto. 


And now we return to our regular Monday broadcast, er, feature, MMGM.  See Shannon Messenger's blog for the links to other Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts.

The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin (Sept 22, 2015, Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, ages 10 and up)

Synopsis (from Indiebound): After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting--things don't just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory--even if it means traveling the globe, alone. Suzy's achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe...and the potential for love and hope right next door.

Why I recommend it: Beautiful writing and an expertly crafted plot. The simple, yet luminous language -- and Suzy's earnest desire -- makes this a joy to read, even though the subject matter is weighty with sadness. It's easy to see why The Thing About Jellyfish is a National Book Award Finalist (winners will be announced November 18) and has earned starred reviews from PW, Booklist, School Library Journal and others. 

Suzy's grief is heartbreakingly realistic. I lost a good friend at age 10 (she rode her bike across a busy street and never saw the truck that hit her), so this moving story affected me deeply. This book should also win at least a Newbery honor in January.

Favorite line: They are moving silently, endlessly, all of them, through the darkness of the sea (from pg. 109).

Bonus: You're bound to learn something about jellyfish!

Have you read The Thing About Jellyfish?  If not, what MG novels have you read that deal poignantly with grief?

Monday, October 26, 2015

Guest post (and Giveaway) from Suzette Valle, 101 MOVIES TO SEE BEFORE YOU GROW UP

I'm honored to be part of the blog tour for an adorable new book about movies! 

101 Movies to See Before You Grow Up by Suzette Valle (Oct 13, 2015, Walter Foster Jr/Quarto Publishing, for ages 8 and up, 144 pages)

All of my favorites are in here! I'll bet yours are too. This is fun for the entire family. It's a bright, colorful book, plus it's interactive (you can rate the movies yourself). This book would be a perfect gift for the middle grader in your life.


Suzette Valle is an award-winning mother of two and freelance writer focusing on family entertainment. She graduated with a B.A. from the University of San Diego, and has a Master's Degree from Oxford University, England. She also has her own blog, Mamarazzi Knows, where she writes about parenting in a celebrity-driven society and all aspects of entertainment. She is a featured Hollyblogger at the award-winning Hollywood publication The where she contributes film reviews, interviews with celebrities, and has covered and written about pop-culture events like Comic-Con International where she's interviewed actors, directors, producers and writers about current and upcoming projects. She wrote over 30 articles for the monthly column Parent Talk for AOL's, and headed this publication's Parents Council in her community. Suzette lives in the seaside town of Coronado, California. This enchanted island is also known as the Emerald City because L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, penned several of the Oz books here. Suzette enjoys watching movies, and walks on the beach with her husband of 25 years and Bella, her adorable dog.

Follow Suzette on Twitter

And now for an exclusive guest post from Suzette. I asked her what her favorite movie was when she was growing up. Take it away, Suzette!

One of my favorite movies growing up was “The Parent Trap.” The original 1961 film starring Hayley Mills as the twins just captured my imagination. This film had to be in the book, especially since there was a popular remake with Lindsay Lohan that introduced this plot to a new generation. Though this is still one my personal favorite films, I think I would rather tell you about my favorite movie experience with my family, one that made a long-lasting impact on all of us: “Harry Potter.” This movie franchise had to be in the book. It was so significant that the American Film Institute gave Harry Potter a special award and recognition, “Eight films that earned the trust of a generation who wished for the beloved books of J.K. Rowling to come to life on the silver screen. The collective wizardry of an epic ensemble gave us the gift of growing older with Harry, Ron and Hermione as the magic of Hogwarts sprung from the films and into the hearts and minds of Muggles around the world.”

Before we watched any of the Harry Potter films, my husband and I would take turns reading the books aloud to our kids. We had a special routine for this. We'd sit by the fireplace with our favorite blankets, a cup of hot chocolate, and we would try to read each character in a different voice and (terrible) British accents. It usually ended up being just the voices of a boy or girl without accents since the kids would ask us to simply stop the torture. Ha!

Going to the theater to watch the books come to life on the silver screen was the first experience our children had with the book-to-movie process! We also encouraged our kids to wear their favorite Harry Potter costume to watch the films, which most kids and families tended to do at the time. I'll never forget the wide-eyed looks on their faces when they'd recognize a scene from the book, or getting elbowed when the kids noticed something was a little different from the original storyline. As adults now, 20 and 23, our kids now know that sometimes the film version has to be a little different from the book to add an element of surprise for the audience members who might think they already know the story.

After watching each of the Potter movies, it was fascinating to hear our children compare the book to the film, and listening to their observations about the differences they noticed as little film critics made all the effort we made to make this a special experience for them worth it.

One aspect that we really enjoyed about reading the books before watching the movies, was how this filled us with anticipation and excitement to see Harry, Ron, Hermione and Hogwarts materialize on screen as we had seen them in our mind's eye -- it was unlike any other movie had done before or has since then. This series had a gripping effect on us all, didn't it? I'll never forget these precious movie-moments with my family -- they were magical!

If children are not quite ready for the action and adventure of the Harry Potter films, another series that's becoming a family-movie-watching tradition is "How To Train your Dragon." There are 12 books in this series, and they've started to roll out in theaters, too.

This type of family bonding opportunity that movies provide, are the main reason I wrote "101 Movies To See Before You Grow Up." Watching movies at home is the most common activity we share as a family, and I think most families in America do as well. Taking these cinematic journeys together, from the safety and comfort of your home, is a fantastic way to spend time with your children not only before they grow up, but as they grow up. Just like mine grew up along with Harry, Ron, and Hermione!

Thanks so much, Suzette. The original Parent Trap has always been one of my favorites, too. And of course, I watched all the Harry Potter movies with my own kids!

Readers, be sure to check out the next stop on the tour: 

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Fandom Monthly Magazine

Now for the giveaway details: One lucky reader will win a copy of 101 MOVIES TO SEE BEFORE YOU GROW UP. To enter, you must be a follower of this blog and you must comment on this post. If you mention this giveaway on Twitter or other social media, please let me know and I'll give you extra chances. This giveaway is open to US/Canadian addresses only and will end at 10 pm EST on Sunday November 8, 2015. The winner will be announced on Monday November 9th. Good luck!

Monday, October 19, 2015

FULL CICADA MOON by Marilyn Hilton

"If you wrote from experience, you'd get 
maybe one book, maybe three poems. 
Writers write from empathy."   Nikki Giovanni 

(from Conversations with Nikki Giovanni, edited by 
Virginia C. Fowler, c 1992, University Press of Mississippi)  

Full Cicada Moon by Marilyn Hilton (September 8, 2015, Dial Books for Young Readers, for ages 8 and up)

Synopsis (from the publisher): It’s 1969, and the Apollo 11 mission is getting ready to go to the moon. But for half-black, half-Japanese Mimi, moving to a predominantly white Vermont town is enough to make her feel alien. Suddenly, Mimi’s appearance is all anyone notices. She struggles to fit in with her classmates, even as she fights for her right to stand out by entering science competitions and joining Shop Class instead of Home Ec. And even though teachers and neighbors balk at her mixed-race family and her refusals to conform, Mimi’s dreams of becoming an astronaut never fade—no matter how many times she’s told no.

This historical middle-grade novel is told in poems from Mimi’s perspective over the course of one year in her new town, and shows readers that positive change can start with just one person speaking up.

Why I recommend it: I used to shy away from novels in verse, until I read May B. by Caroline Starr Rose. Now I love them. Full Cicada Moon moved me to tears. Happy ones. And that's saying something, because I rarely cry when I read MG. Mimi is one of the strongest girl characters you'll ever meet, and her story is one you'll remember long after you've closed the book and gone on with your life. The writing is spare and simple, yet gorgeous. If last year's Newbery winner wasn't a novel in verse, I would say this has a fighting chance of winning.

Plus, the cover is downright stunning.

There's been a lot of controversy in social media lately about whether or not authors should write from the POV of people from a different culture or race. In the author's note in the back of this book, Marilyn Hilton says, "I wrote Mimi's story in wonder and terror and awe, not knowing if I could or should write it." But she received much encouragement from her agent, her editor, and her friends, including Keiko Higuchi. I have to say, I'm glad Marilyn wrote this book (see the quote above by Nikki Giovanni, which says it better than I can). Reading Full Cicada Moon has made my life richer. This is one I will re-read.

Favorite lines (from pg. 370):

I used to think the people of Vermont
were like the snow--
and slow to thaw.

But now I think
they're what's underneath.

Bonus: This would be excellent for starting classroom discussions about tolerance.

Marilyn Hilton's website

Follow Marilyn on Twitter

What do you think, readers? Do you freeze up at the idea of reading free verse novels? Or have you begun to thaw?

Monday, October 12, 2015

And the winner of ADA BYRON LOVELACE is...

First, huge congrats to Laurie Wallmark for the STARRED review of Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine in Publishers Weekly! Here's a link to the review. I'm so happy for you, Laurie. It's well-deserved.

And now... (drum roll, please)

I have a winner to announce! According to randomizer, the winner of the hardcover copy of Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine by Laurie Wallmark is...


Congrats, Michael. Expect an email from me asking for your address. The book will be coming directly from Laurie. So if you want it autographed, I'm sure she'd be happy to do that for you.

Thanks to everyone who entered the giveaway. 

Monday, October 5, 2015

Appleblossom the Possum and Hamster Princess: A Double Book Review

Giveaway reminder: You still have almost a week to enter the giveaway of ADA BYRON LOVELACE AND THE THINKING MACHINE by Laurie Wallmark.

*   *   *

Now onto MMGM. And it's a two-fer this time! For other MMGM posts, visit Shannon Messenger.

I enjoyed each of these younger middle grade novels, for different reasons. So I'm featuring them both. The source for both: arcs from Penguin Random House.

Hamster Princess 1: Harriet the Invincible by Ursula Vernon (August 2015, Dial Books, for ages 8 to 12)

Synopsis (from Indiebound): Harriet Hamsterbone is not your typical princess. She may be quite stunning in the rodent realm (you'll have to trust her on this one), but she is not so great at trailing around the palace looking ethereal or sighing a lot. She finds the royal life rather . . . dull. One day, though, Harriet's parents tell her of the curse that a rat placed on her at birth, dooming her to prick her finger on a hamster wheel when she's twelve and fall into a deep sleep. For Harriet, this is most wonderful news: It means she's invincible until she's twelve! After all, no good curse goes to waste. And so begins a grand life of adventure with her trusty riding quail, Mumfrey...until her twelfth birthday arrives and the curse manifests in a most unexpected way.

Why I recommend it: Normally, I don't lean toward series books and never read Dragon Breath, Vernon's first series. But I found this hamster parody of Sleeping Beauty hilarious. Guaranteed to make you giggle. Harriet is a sassy and spunky main character, who personifies Girl Power. Give this to readers who like Babymouse.

Bonus: The large print and plenty of illustrations make this a breeze for younger readers.

Appleblossom the Possum by Holly Goldberg Sloan, illustrated by Gary A. Rosen (August 2015, Dial, for ages 8 to 12)

Synopsis (from Indiebound): Mama has trained up her baby possums in the ways of their breed, and now it's time for all of them, even little Appleblossom, to make their way in the world. Appleblossom knows the rules: she must never be seen during the day, and she must avoid cars, humans, and the dreaded hairies (sometimes known as dogs). Even so, Appleblossom decides to spy on a human family and accidentally falls down their chimney. The curious Appleblossom, her faithful brothers who launch a hilarious rescue mission, and even the little girl in the house have no idea how fascinating the big world can be. But they're about to find out.

Why I recommend it: A sweet story about a family of actors--er, possums. Appleblossom is the curious one and her curiosity gets her into trouble. She's a lively and endearing new character. If you like animal stories (especially when the animals quote Shakespeare), this one's for you.

Bonus: This would be a terrific read-aloud.

(Be forewarned that Appleblossom isn't the least bit similar to Counting By 7's. If I didn't know they were both written by Holly Goldberg Sloan, I never would have guessed.)

Read any good animal tales lately?